Embargoed: 12:01 a.m. ET
March 4, 2016

Poor helmet fit associated with concussion severity in high school football players

Coaches, trainers and physicians need to supervise helmet checks throughout the sports season


ORLANDO, Fla.—High school football players with ill-fitting helmets are at greater risk for more severe concussions, according to a study presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

“This study suggests that incorrect helmet fit may be one variable that predisposes a football player to sustain a more severe concussion,” said senior study author Joseph Torg, MD, an orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine at Temple University Health System, who has identified acceptable tackle techniques for the NFL.

Attention has zeroed in on the persistent problem of concussions in high school football; however, this study is the first to single out the impact of helmet fit based on a long period of study covering nine sports seasons from 2005 to 2014. Orthopaedic sports medicine experts analyzed information from 4,580 athletes ranging in age from 13 to 19. Data was obtained from the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System for players with first-time concussions.

Athletes who suffered concussions due to improper fitting helmets had higher rates of drowsiness, hyperexcitability and sensitivity to noise. Many of these athletes experienced more than one of the 13 concussive symptoms reviewed retrospectively in the study. In addition, athletes wearing helmets lined with air bladders suffered concussions that lasted longer.

“Correct helmet fit varies with helmet design, and players are encouraged to fit their equipment according to manufacturers’ instructions,” said study co-author Dustin Greenhill, MD, an orthopaedic surgery resident at Temple.

Dr. Greenhill explained that when helmets don’t fit correctly, an athlete’s cervical muscles in their neck and head may not be able to reduce the force of impact on the brain, especially when parts of the body rotate during high-speed hits. Helmet fit can change and evolve during the season and games, due to sweat, hair style, rain, cold weather clothing, and other factors.

“The risk factor of poor helmet fit should be minimized through mandated adult supervision and midseason spot checks,” Dr. Greenhill said.

Study Abstract

 

View the 2016 AAOS Annual Meeting Disclosure Statements

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
With more than 39,000 members, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) is the world’s largest association of musculoskeletal specialists. The AAOS provides education programs for orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals, champions and advances the highest musculoskeletal care for patients, and is the authoritative source of information on bone and joint conditions, treatments, and related issues.


Visit AAOS at:
Newsroom.aaos.org
for bone and joint health news, stats, facts, images and interview requests.

ANationinMotion.org
for inspirational patient stories, and orthopaedic surgeon tips on maintaining bone and joint health, avoiding injuries, treating musculoskeletal conditions and navigating recovery.

Orthoinfo.org
for patient information on hundreds of orthopaedic diseases and conditions.

Facebook.com/AAOS1


Twitter.com/AAOS1

 

Print   Download Print-friendly PDF

 
 
Multimedia Gallery

Click here to view and download images and videos
from our multimedia gallery.
  image

image

Join Us
Facebook Twitter YouTube  

 

 
Share
Facebook Twitter Share Email
 
  Contacts

For inquiries on this release, contact :

Sheryl Cash                                            
P: 847-384-4032 • M: 847-804-7486 • scash@aaos.org


Lauren Pearson Riley
P: 847-384-4031 • M: 708-227-1773 • pearson@aaos.org

Click here to view Award Winner releases.

Click here to view Announcements.

 
 
 
TUESDAY, MARCH 1

One in two Americans have a musculoskeletal condition costing an estimated $874 billion each year in treatment, lost wages

More than half of child lawn mower injuries require an amputation

Youngest and oldest patients more likely to report pain, lower activity levels following total knee replacement (TKR) surgery

Physician empathy a key driver of patient satisfaction

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2

Steroid injections administered too close to hip, knee replacement surgery may increase infection risk

New research estimates at-home recovery days for the 10 most common pediatric orthopaedic surgeries

THURSDAY, MARCH 3

ADHD medications associated with diminished bone health in kids

Anterior versus posterior: Does surgical approach impact hip replacement outcomes?

FRIDAY, MARCH 4

Rethinking rehab: New research looks at efficacy of self-guided and accelerated therapy programs following total joint replacement

Poor helmet fit associated with concussion severity and duration in high school football players

Empowering orthopaedic patients: Digital fitness devices help patients monitor health and activity, improve outcomes

Halting or reducing opioids prior to hip or knee replacement surgery linked to fewer complications, improved outcomes, and reduced post-surgical opioid use

Remote orthopaedic care may successfully, cost-effectively treat common conditions